U in the News

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Dan Voytas is quoted in The Washington Post (PDF) on the future of food editing; Michael Osterholm is quoted at FiveThirtyEight about making a flu shot your Halloween Tradition; Laura Niedernhofer is quoted in The Guardian about new discoveries in the biology of aging; Patrick Horst is quoted in a Star Tribune story about active baby boomers testing the limits of artificial joints; William Iacono is quoted in Wired about polygraphs for job screenings; Marc Bellemare is quoted in The New York Times (PDF) about whether your salad habit is good for the planet; George John is quoted in the Kare 11 story, “Black Friday Is Coming. Here’s What Not to Buy Until Then”; Christopher Terry is quoted at Slate about the federal government’s war with California over net neutrality; Paul Robbins and Edgar Arriaga are quoted in CBS Minnesota about a discovery that could slow aging; Elizabeth Lukanen is quoted in the Star Tribune about the soaring costs of family health coverage in the U.S.; Lynn Blewett is quoted in a Forbes story about high deductibles in healthcare as employers shift costs.

Robina Institute to provide research on major probation and parole initiative

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

The Laura and John Arnold Foundation (LJAF) and Pew Charitable Trusts announced a national research and reform effort to make probation and parole systems fairer and more effective. In partnership with LJAF and Pew, the University of Minnesota's Robina Institute will provide research support to help draft a model for a research-based policy framework. To strengthen this effort, the Laura and John Arnold Foundation is also supporting research partners at the Council of State Governments who will develop a 50-state snapshot of probation and parole revocations to prison, and the Urban Institute and Crime and Justice Institute to evaluate state reforms currently underway.

Supply Chain Management Program ranked #6

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

The Carlson School’s Master of Science in Supply Chain Management program was ranked sixth in the nation, according to a ranking released by Gartner. Gartner, a global research and advisory firm, evaluated 30 programs across 46 eligible universities throughout the country. This was the first time the Carlson MS SCM program was eligible for the list. Now entering its third year, the program is ranked among programs that have existed for decades.

Kortshagen elected fellow of the American Physical Society

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Mechanical Engineering Professor Uwe Kortshagen has been elected as a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). The number of APS Fellows elected each year is limited to no more than 1/2 of 1 percent of the membership. Kortshagen is being honored "for contributions to our fundamental understanding of non-linear electron transport and plasma-nanoparticle interactions in low temperature plasmas and the development of plasma based synthesis of nanoparticles." See this and other Mechanical Engineering awards.

U in the News

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Larry Zanko and Sara Post are quoted in a Duluth News Tribune story about a product developed by UMD’s Natural Resources Research Institute to fill potholes; Traci Mann is quoted in The Washington Post (PDF) about a new Weight Watchers program that critics say is ‘diet culture’ in disguise; Lee Frelich comments about Minnesota's fall colors changing with the climate at Minnesota Public Radio; Ann Parr is quoted at Scientific American about a man walking after years of paralysis; Russell Luepker is quoted at CNN about a drugmaker’s claims regarding major heart benefits of a fish oil derivative; George Trachte is quoted in a Duluth News Tribune story about water as an overlooked “health food”; Philipp Dahm is quoted in a Reuters story about guidelines around prostate cancer screening for men; Jessica Hellmann is quoted in the MPR News story, “Climate change and Minnesota's midterm elections: a voter guide”; Michael Osterholm is quoted in a USA Today story about whether influenza could kill again as it historically has; Joel Waldfogel was cited in The Seattle Times story, “How 5 good jobs turned into bad ones.”

UMN will lead $5.3 million federal grant to improve electronic circuit design

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

The University of Minnesota has received a four-year, $5.3 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), an agency of the U.S. Department of Defense, to lead an effort that could spark the next wave of U.S. semiconductor innovation and broaden the competitive field for circuit design. Sachin Sapatnekar, professor of electrical and computer engineering, will lead the grant. Integrated circuits power almost every electronic device we use today. The U of M is one of only 11 lead universities or companies to receive funding from the DARPA Intelligent Design of Electronic Assets (IDEA) program, a new program under the DARPA Electronics Resurgence Initiative. Other partners on the University of Minnesota-led grant are Texas A&M University and Intel, a leader in the semiconductor industry.

Building a baseline for biocomputing

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Synthetic biologist Kate Adamala is among a group of researchers chosen to advance work on “biocomputers” that integrate synthetic biology with semiconductor technology. The $12 million NSF project funds the creation of bio-based semiconductors using synthetic biology. Adamala will work with colleagues at MIT and elsewhere to build a bio-based circuit using genetic circuits embedded in synthetic cells. Researchers anticipate that biological structures integrated with semiconductor technology could store 1,000 times more data than current capabilities, and retain the data for more than a century, while consuming much less energy.

NSF renews funding for long-term research at Cedar Creek Reserve

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

The National Science Foundation recently recommended renewal of funding for long-term research at Cedar Creek for another six-year term setting the stage for the continuation of longstanding experiments as well as the addition of new studies. This funding is part of NSF’s Long Term Ecological Research program, which has provided continuous support for Cedar Creek research since 1982. Using the new NSF funds, project co-leaders Eric Seabloom and Sarah Hobbie along with other researchers at the station will continue work on decades-long studies including the longest-running biodiversity and elevated CO2 experiments in the world, and some of the world’s longest-running studies of nutrient enrichment and fire frequency. At the same time, a number of new initiatives will get the green light.

Department of Education grant of $4 million

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

The U.S. Department of Education named the Institute for Global Studies a National Resource Center in International Studies, providing an award of $4 million for projects furthering international studies at the U of from 2018-22. Included in the funds, the department provided grants to fund Foreign Language & Area Studies Fellowships for International, African, and Asian Studies. The program doubles the current number of undergraduate students who receive fellowships.

CEHD recognized as #4 public school of education

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

The College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) has been recognized as the #4 public school of education in the Academic Ranking of World Universities’ 2018 college rankings. The college was ranked seventh overall among private and public universities.

U in the News

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Judith Eckerle and the U of M Adoption Clinic were recognized by U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar as a 2018 Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute Angels in Adoption Honoree, as reported by KARE 11; Eric Singsaas is interviewed at KARE 11 about the science of fall color change; Aaron Sojourner is quoted in a Star Tribune report about rising costs canceling out wage increases for most workers; Michael Kyba is quoted in a Science story about skeletal stem cells found in humans promising new treatments for fractures and osteoporosis; Anne Murray is quoted at WRBC in a story about aspirin being potentially harmful for healthy, older adults; Suma Jacob is quoted in the Duluth News Tribune regarding the largest ever autism research project; David Bedford answers CBS Minnesota’s “Good Question: Should Apples Be Refrigerated?”; Fatih Guvenen is quoted in a Wall Street Journal (PDF) story about benefits gains exceeding wage growth; Michael Kim is quoted in a City Pages story about Prince and what it means when the U of M confers an honorary degree.

Goh appointed vice president for equity and diversity

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Michael Goh has been appointed vice president for equity and diversity at the University of Minnesota. Goh has served as interim vice president for equity and diversity since October 2017. He has been part of the University of Minnesota community for nearly 25 years. Through his experiences as a doctoral student, faculty member, associate vice provost for equity and diversity, and interim vice president for equity and diversity, he has gained a deep and broad knowledge of the University’s opportunities and challenges. He has also prioritized strengthening connections between the University and communities throughout Minnesota.

Postdoctoral associate named Hanna H. Gray Fellow

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

University of Minnesota postdoctoral associate Jose Alejo has been named a Hanna H. Gray Fellow by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). As one of 15 Fellows announced this month, Alejo will receive mentoring and research funding up to $1.4 million that will span eight years.

School of Nursing professor named to AG’s sexual assault work group

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

School of Nursing Professor Carolyn Porta is one of 10 statewide experts named to a sexual assault investigation work group by Attorney General Lori Swanson. The group, made up of leaders in the areas of victim advocacy, health care and law enforcement, will make recommendations to the Legislature to improve state laws and policies regarding sexual assault and the criminal justice system’s treatment of these crimes.

Interdisciplinary all-stars

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

IonE and the Humphrey School will lead a new multi-university project to scale and institutionalize interdisciplinary research – one of three winning proposals in the new NAKFI Challenge. The University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs and Institute on the Environment, along with Duke University, are leading a new, multi-university project that will explore how to make interdisciplinary research more common and more effective. The two-year research project, “Institutionalizing Interdisciplinarity,” is funded with a $500,000 NAKFI Challenge grant from the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative – and includes 13 universities from across the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada. It is one of three winners of the new competition, chosen from a field of 79 proposals.

U in the News

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Colin McFadden was featured on MPR about an app he created with coworker Sam Porter for the Minneapolis Institute of Art; Nick Phelps is interviewed by KSTP about controlling aquatic invasive species; Tracy Bibelnieks is quoted in a Duluth News Tribune report about life expectancy variation across Duluth and Minnesota; Lynn Blewett is quoted in a Star Tribune story about the number of Minnesotans without health insurance growing by 18,000; Pamela Schreiner was interviewed by KIMT about a study showing the benefits of companion animals; John Coleman is quoted in a MinnPost story featuring the new CLA exhibit “On Purpose: Portrait of the Liberal Arts”; Mark Seeley and Kenny Blumenfeld are quoted about winters becoming wimpier in Echo Press; Katy Kozhimannil is quoted in a MinnPost about a study showing that serious childbirth complications have risen dramatically in the U.S.

U of M to develop machine learning techniques for monitoring global change

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

The University of Minnesota has received a three-year, $1.43 million grant from the National Science Foundation to advance machine learning techniques to better monitor global agricultural and environmental change—a practice that can help society address the challenges of adapting to a changing climate, managing land use and natural resources, and sustainably feeding a growing population. The NSF grant funds a team of researchers at the University’s College of Science and Engineering (CSE), College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS), and Minnesota Supercomputing Institute (MSI) to advance the state-of-the-art in machine learning for analyzing data from earth-observing satellites and generating actionable information on a global scale. The project’s main focus will be to advance the state-of-art in machine learning techniques for analyzing spatial and temporal agricultural cropping data and urban landscapes.

The Raptor Center receives funding for major three-year initiative

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

The world-renowned Raptor Center recently secured funding for a major three-year initiative, providing the opportunity to raise the bar for wildlife rehabilitation care across all species. The program is being designed and implemented by The Raptor Center with hopes of improving animal welfare in wildlife rehabilitation. TRC plans to use its 40 years of experience to strategically build community among rehabilitation centers. It will begin with pilot efforts in seven states.

U in the News

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Doug Hartmann is quoted in the New York Times about the historical context of Colin Kaepernick taking a knee; Megan Weber is quoted at MPR News about the U of M AIS Detectors program finding the invasive starry stonewort species in a Hubbard County lake; the 'Target Effect' is real and you're probably a victim of it, with comments from Joseph Redden at Kare 11; Robert Sterner is quoted in a Weather Channel story about the unprecedented' algae bloom in Lake Superior; Kathryn Draeger is quoted in MinnPost about helping small growers in Minnesota get fresh produce into grocery stores; Steve Sanders is quoted in Slate about electric scooters causing headaches on college campuses; Paul Morin is quoted in the New York Times (and many other publications) about new research showing Antarctica like never seen before, using high resolution satellite imagery.

Researchers receive $8 million to study fundamental science of waves

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

U of M researchers have received an award of $8 million over the next four years from the Simons Foundation to fund an international collaboration. The project, called the Simons Collaboration on Localization of Waves, will be headquartered at the University of Minnesota and will bring together top experts from around the world to study the fundamental science of waves.

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