U of M research receives $3.2 million grant to study childhood severe obesity interventions

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

About one in three kids in the U.S. is overweight or obese, which is nearly three times the number seen in the 1960s. A team of researchers led by Claudia Fox, associate professor of Pediatrics and co-director of the Center for Pediatric Obesity Medicine at the University of Minnesota, has received a five-year, $3.2 million grant to study treatments for severe obesity in adolescents. The grant is awarded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health.

U in the News

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Scott St. George is quoted in a New York Times (PDF) story about using music to illustrate climate change; Ziad Nahas was interviewed in a CBS Minnesota story on how light therapy works; Tetyana Shippee is quoted in a MPR News story on a state report card being developed for assisted living facilities; George John comments on the future of brick-and-mortar shopping centers at CBS Minnesota; P.J. Fleck's new contract was covered by the Mpls./St. Paul Business Journal (PDF); Robert Stewart and Christopher Uggen are featured in a Inside Higher Ed story on a U of M study showing that colleges are more likely to reject applicants who report felony convictions; Andrew Winton comments in CBS Minnesota on the growing trend in online banking; Elaine Tyler May is quoted in a New York Times (PDF) story about fertility access; William Doherty is mentioned in The Atlantic story, “Can Marriage Counseling Save America?”

New Medical School research to focus on schizophrenia

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Michael-Paul Schallmo, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry, recently received a $740,000 grant to begin using vision as a tool in studying schizophrenia.

Grant to study music therapy’s impact on neurodevelopment and pain in preterm infants

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Sonya Wang, pediatric neurologist with M Health Fairview and associate professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of Minnesota Medical School, recently received a grant of more than $800,000 over two years from the National Institutes of Health to research the effects of music-based intervention (MBI) on neurodevelopment and pain response in preterm infants. The objectives for the research are to identify differences between MBI and controls in preterm brain maturation and early neurodevelopment, and to measure differences in preterm pain responses between MBI and controls. Michael Silverman, director of the Music Therapy Program and a distinguished teaching professor in the U of M School of Music, will be working alongside Wang on this research grant.

U in the News

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Jane Kirtley is quoted in a New York Times (PDF) story on the latest entry in podcasts: true-crime ‘copcasts’; David Tilman is quoted in a National Public Radio story on a study showing that a healthy diet is better for the planet; George John comments in CBS Minnesota on the ever-proliferating rise of streaming services; Lucy Dunne is interviewed in Gizmodo on the future of wearable technology; Pri Shah is interviewed in the WCCO story, “What Makes A Good Boss?”; Rachel Hardeman is quoted in US News & World Report on a Minneapolis birth center that is battling racial inequity; Vic Massaglia, Meagan Pierluissi, and Jabra Kawas are quoted in a Minnesota Daily story about a new U of M group created for faculty, staff and graduate students veterans; Mark Bergen is quoted in Marketplace about the marketing tactics behind those odd weights and sizes you see at the supermarket; Alik Widge is quoted in MinnPost about why a much-hyped treatment for depression faces an uncertain future.

U in the News

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Robert McMaster is quoted in the Minnesota Daily on the record diversity found in this year’s U of M Twin Cities freshman class; Robert Vince, Swati More, and James Beach are mentioned in a Kare 11 story about how their eye scan could catch Alzheimer's early; George John is quoted in the Pioneer Press (PDF) about how malls are embracing new occupants as brick-and-mortar retail struggles; Jason Varin is quoted in the Yahoo! story, “You're Probably Taking Too Much Advil”; sun exposure can affect your microbiome, with comments from Alexander Khoruts at NBC News; the U.S. has stopped Ebola before, but that is no guarantee it will repeat that success, with comments from Michael Osterholm in the Washington Post (PDF); Sharon Jansa answers the Star Tribune’s question, “How did Minnesota become the Gopher State?”; Nancy Sims is interviewed in a Kare 11 story about Lizzo sharing a writing credit for her song, 'Truth Hurts'; Katharine Nelson comments at CBS Minnesota about why some of us are so afraid of creepy-crawly animals; Sexually active Minnesota teens are making healthier choices, with comments from Jill Farris in the Star Tribune; Jay Amundson comments in a Minnesota Daily story about U of M campus efforts toward climate action.

CAREI to co-lead new $6.3 million federal grant

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

A new partnership between the Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement (CAREI), the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Wisconsin-based nonprofit Education Analytics has won a five-year, $6.3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education. The project’s goal is to improve the academic achievement of elementary and secondary school students in the two-state region by advancing the use of evidence-based practices.

New grant to decipher how microbes communicate

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

A recent National Institute of Health (NIH) grant for $1.9 million over five years will allow Mikael Elias, assistant professor of biochemistry, molecular biology and biophysics and a member of the BioTechnology Institute, to continue exploring how bacteria communicate with each other. The grant builds on recent discoveries in the Elias lab. Bacteria rely on a shared language to group up and form communities. Taking advantage of this, the lab recently modified an enzyme to break up this communication pathway. Rather than killing off unwanted bacteria, which is how antibiotics work, the enzyme prevents bacteria from grouping up and lessens their collective impact.

School of Nursing receives HEED Award for 4th consecutive year

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

The University of Minnesota School of Nursing has been awarded the Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity Magazine for the fourth consecutive year. The HEED Award honors U.S. nursing, medical, dental, pharmacy, osteopathic, veterinary, and other health schools and centers that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion. The school’s educational programming and opportunities to develop diversity, equity, and inclusivity competencies and its efforts to recruit and retain diverse and underrepresented students and faculty factored into its selection as a HEED Award recipient.

U in the News

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Ruifeng Cao, Dong Liu, and Salil Saurav Pathak are quoted in a Minnesota Daily story showing that a little stress is good for your biological clock; Jim Luby is quoted in the BBC News story, “Can a new apple take over the world?”; Edward Goetz is quoted in a Star Tribune story on the Minneapolis City Council beginning research on rent control; Michael McAlpine is quoted in a Science story about a fast new 3D printing method that create objects as big as a human; John Stavig is mentioned in a Twin Cities Business story about the art and science of educating entrepreneurs; Art Rolnick is quoted in a Star Tribune story on the effort to deport “dreamers” and pushback from Minnesota companies; Michelle Phelps is interviewed in a CBS Minnesota story about the number of police officers a city should have; Kathryn Nelson is quoted and U of M research is cited in the New York Times (PDF) story, “What Are the Benefits of Turmeric?”; Merrie Kaas is quoted in the Thrive story, “Dealing with Depression.”

Umbreit named among top 50 social workers in U.S. history

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Professor Mark Umbreit, School of Social Work, has been ranked among the top 50 most notable social workers in U.S. history by the International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW). The rankings are based on the quality and impact of the person’s work. Umbreit received his PhD in Social Work from the University of Minnesota. His three decades of work have focused on restorative justice, indigenous justice and healing, human rights, victim services, criminal/juvenile justice, peacemaking, spirituality, forgiveness, reconciliation, mediation, conflict resolution, and social change. He has provided lectures, training, and consultation in nearly every state and in more than 25 countries on every major continent. His 11 books and more than 200 other publications have had a major impact on criminal justice policy in the U.S. and other countries. His recent work has been with the United Nations Development Program in the Islamic Republic of Turkey and in Brazil. Learn more about Umbreit.

Dean Bloomberg Elected to NAPA

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Dean Laura Bloomberg has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) in recognition of her ongoing contributions to public administration and policy. She joins current Humphrey School faculty members Jodi Sandfort, Greg Lindsey, Samuel Myers Jr., and John Bryson as a NAPA fellow.

New collaboration with Target on cyber security education

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

The College of Science and Engineering recently announced a three-year collaboration with Target that includes a $250,000 donation from Target to fund programs that will educate the next generation of cyber security experts. The donation, provided by Target’s Cyber Security department, is Target’s first major gift to the University’s College of Science and Engineering. The gift helps build course curriculum and offers hands-on information security experiences, student scholarships, fellowships and grants, as well as opportunities for students to network with cyber security experts.

U in the News

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Myles Shaver comments in the Star Tribune about why so many Fortune 500 companies call Minnesota home; Brittany Lewis, Terrence Anderson, and Ed Goetz are featured in the MinnPost story, “Meet the research outfit behind the city of Minneapolis’ big equity effort”; Barbara Kappler is quoted in the Minnesota Daily about a significant uptick in international student enrollment at the U of M; Wendy Lougee is quoted in the Chronicle of Higher Education about the future of campus libraries and “sticky interdependence”; Garry Jenkins is quoted in the Minnesota Daily story on the Law School’s largest first-year class in almost a decade; Anne Melzer is quoted in USA Today about whether vaping is safer than smoking; Teddie Potter is quoted in Star Tribune about Minnesota’s plan to track urban air pollution by ZIP code; Peter Huckfeldt is quoted in Healthline about President Trump’s changes to Medicare and how they may affect healthcare; Jeannie Larson comments in HealthDay Consumer story, “Don't Let SAD Get the Better of You.”

UMAA outstanding volunteers and programs

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

University of Minnesota alumni (Twin Cities and Rochester) and networks were recognized for their contributions at the Alumni Awards Affair during Homecoming week. Awards presented included the U of M Alumni Service Awards, the Distinguished Leadership Award for Internationals, Advocate of the Year, U40 Alumni Leader, Program Extraordinaire, Alumni Society of the Year, and the Alumni Network of the Year.

Community-University Health Center, one of three in Minnesota to receive national award

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Health Resources and Services Administration awarded $85 million to health centers across the nation to improve oral health infrastructure. The Community-University Health Care Center (CUHCC) was one of just three health centers in Minnesota that received this award. The $300,000 award will enable CUHCC to make improvements to their dental clinic and increase patient access, comfort, and optimize care.

Luce receives Jay N. "Ding" Darling Memorial Award for Wildlife Stewardship

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Bell Museum curator of exhibits Don Luce has been presented with the Jay N. "Ding" Darling Memorial Award for Wildlife Stewardship Through Art. The award encompasses and recognizes any type of “artistic” item or accomplishment that promotes, achieves, or benefits wildlife stewardship.

U in the News

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

No need to rake leaves, reports USA Today, with comments from Dan Sandor; Irina Stepanov is quoted in a Los Angeles Times story about what we know about the deadly lung illnesses tied to vaping; Stephanie Carlson is quoted in Education Dive about the 50th year of Sesame Street; Mpls./St. Paul Magazine ranks all of Minnesota’s U of M-developed apples, with mention of David Bedford; Jakub Tolar is quoted in a Mpls./St. Paul Business Journal (PDF) story on the new name and partnership between Fairview and the U of M; Mary Curtain is interviewed in the CBS Minnesota story, “What’s The History Behind U.S. Relations With Ukraine?”; Hyun Kim is quoted in a Minnesota Daily story about the health implications of climate change.

$3.9 million NIH grant conduct to research cytomegalovirus

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Mark Schleiss of the U of M Medical School has been awarded a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant for $3.9 million to conduct research studies of novel vaccine strategies for cytomegalovirus (CMV), the most common infection that causes birth defects and disabilities in babies in the United States. The National Academy of Medicine has identified a CMV vaccine as being the highest public health priority for any new vaccine. Schleiss will use the grant to research vaccine strategies that may be relevant to women. Using a guinea pig model of congenital CMV infection, Schleiss and his team will examine correlates of protection and use recombinant techniques to modify the immune modulation genes encoded by CMV that impair the protective immune response.

Grant helps researchers tackle porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

University of Minnesota scientists are collaborating to look at how PRRS virus evolves to understand disease spread, and advance mitigation and control efforts. A new grant of nearly $3 million will help University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) researchers and collaborators at the University of Edinburgh’s Roslin Institute investigate how porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus evolves and spreads. The research will help scientists and producers anticipate a herd’s susceptibility to different strains of PRRS virus, and customize mitigation efforts accordingly.

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