Six researchers named Generation Next/UROC Faculty Fellows

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Six researchers have been named Generation Next/UROC Faculty Fellows and charged with creating teams to tackle the question: "Why is there an achievement gap in the context of Minneapolis-St. Paul and what promising practices are helping close that gap?" Coordinated by the University's Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center (UROC) in partnership with Minneapolis-based Generation Next, the fellows will zero in on disparities and the structural roots of the achievement gap to create a scholarly roadmap that works in tandem with other University and Generation Next-based efforts.

Samuel Myers to receive Westerfield Award

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Samuel Myers, Jr., the Roy Wilkins Professor of Human Relations and Social Justice at the University of Minnesota's Humphrey School of Public Affairs, has been named recipient of the Samuel Z. Westerfield, Jr., Award by the National Economic Association (NEA). The award, the NEA's highest honor, is in recognition of Myers' distinguished service, outstanding scholarship, and achievement of high standards of excellence, and will be presented at the organization's annual meeting on Jan. 4 in Boston.

Nursing faculty to launch Ebola treatment center in Liberia

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Four School of Nursing faculty were invited by the American Refugee Committee to be part of a leadership team of health professionals charged with launching a new Ebola treatment center in southern Liberia. Associate Professor Cheryl Robertson and Clinical Assistant Professor Dorcas Kunkel depart Minnesota this week. Their extensive public health experience in Africa position them well for their charge to with recruit and train health care staff, establish protocols and procedures and oversee the opening of the 60-bed treatment center in River Gee County on the southern border of Liberia. The faculty's involvement is part of a pioneering agreement between the U of M School of Nursing and the American Refugee Committee.

Alok Gupta Named INFORMS ISS Distinguished Academic Fellow

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Professor Alok Gupta has been named an INFORMS Information Systems Society (ISS) Distinguished Fellow. The honor is given to those who have made outstanding intellectual contributions to the field through their published research, editorial appointments to relevant journals, and mentorship to doctoral students and young researchers.

Bruininks receives Lifetime Achievement Award for disability work

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Former U of M president and CEHD dean emeritus Robert Bruininks received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of University Centers on Developmental Disabilities (AUCD) during its annual conference in Washington, D.C. The award is given "… to individuals making a lifetime commitment to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families," and includes recognition of his work as founding director of the college's Institute on Community Integration.

Professor Emeritus Philip Hodge passes away

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Professor Emeritus Philip Hodge from the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics passed away on November 11, 2014. He was a member of the National Academy of Engineering and his research resulted in significant advancements in plasticity theory, including developments in the method of characteristics, limit-analysis, piecewise linear isotropic plasticity, and nonlinear programming applications.

UMN in the News

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Regents Professor Madelon Sprengnether writes about "The power of telling, and writing, of sexual assault" in the Star Tribune; health insurance premiums are rising more slowly, writes Dimitri Drekonja in the Star Tribune; Michael Osterholm comments in Wired magazine on a surprising study that could lead to better flu vaccines; Elizabeth Seaquist discusses the importance in identifying the best treatments for people with type 2 diabetes at KSTP-TVDavid Bedford comments on the hard cider boom and the demand for 'terrible' tasting apples in Vita.MN; U of M researchers have discovered a protein that fights HIV infection, featuring Elizabeth Luengas and Reuben Harris in a story by KSTP; and Ryan Allen of the Humphrey School comments at KARE 11 on local reactions to President Obama's immigration plan.

Kreitzer named co-editor of Global Advances in Health and Medicine

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

School of Nursing Professor and Director of the Center for Spirituality and Healing Mary Jo Kreitzer has been named co-editor in chief of Global Advances in Health and Medicine.

Pfeiffer elected to International Federation of Infection Control Board

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

School of Nursing Clinical Associate Professor Jeanne Pfeiffer was elected to the International Federation of Infection Control Board, representing the United States, Canada, Japan, Israel, New Zealand and Australia. 

Gary Balas has passed away

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

"Distinguished McKnight University Professor Gary Balas, former Head of the Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics Department, passed away on November 12, 2014. A memorial gathering in his honor will be held on December 3rd from 3:30-6:00 p.m. at the Campus Club in the West Wing, located on the fourth floor of Coffman Union, 300 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455."

UMN in the News

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Alan Hirsch talks with the St. Cloud Times about aspirin and decreasing the number of yearly heart attacks in Minnesota; U of M historian Ann Pflaum, Professor Rose Brewer, and David Hamlar spoke on Veterans Day with the Star Tribune about how the GI Bill gave Minnesota veterans a path to the middle class; David Lee comments at WCCO on how to budget for medical care for your dog; Liqiang Chen talked with the MN Daily about a chemical discovery that could ease Parkinson's disease; a plant-based diet is best for the planet, shows research by Professor David Tilman, who is interviewed in Time magazine; CSE Professor Jim Kakalios explains in Wired magazine the science of why no one can lift Thor's hammer. 

Jenny Laaser awarded $60,000 L'Oréal Fellowship

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

University of Minnesota chemistry researcher Jenny Laaser is one of only five recipients nationwide of the 2014 L'Oréal USA For Women in Science Fellowship, which recognizes U.S.-based female researchers for their outstanding contributions in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. Recipients receive $60,000 each for their postdoctoral research.

Laaser, who completed her Ph.D. in physical chemistry last year, is conducting research that will impact future efforts to design gene therapies. Also active in the University’s Women in Science and Engineering group, Laaser helps lead “Cool Chemistry,” an outreach event that brings local middle school girls to campus for chemistry activities and demonstrations.

Fulbright U.S. Scholar Grants

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Four UMTC faculty have received Fulbright U.S. Scholar Grants to teach and/or conduct research abroad during the 2014-15 academic year: Nina Asher, Curriculum and Instruction, CEHD (India); Karlyn Eckman, Forest Resources, CFANS (India); Shalom Michaeli, Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, Medical School (Finland); and Matthew Rahaim, Music, CLA (India).

The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government. The GPS Alliance is the University’s campus representative for the program.

Patent roll call, fall 2014

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Patents allow the most promising discoveries of today to become the game-changing innovations of tomorrow. A key milestone in the transition from the lab to the marketplace, patents protect the ownership of university technologies and grant them real-world applications to benefit society. Congratulations to University of Minnesota faculty who were recently awarded patents for their discoveries.

UMN in the News

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Board of Regents Chair Richard Beeson writes in the Star Tribune about ways the U is addressing student debt; Taylor Hannah, Goldy Gopher’s coach, is interviewed in a WCCO story on getting to know Goldy; Susan Wolf comments in the Star Tribune on the genomic research versus privacy debate; U research is cited in “5 tips to stay healthy if you sit at a computer all day” in Time magazine; agricultural economist Michael Boland comments in Forbes on Cargill's plan to make the world's biggest food business even bigger; Michele Mazzocco is interviewed in The Atlantic in “Turning 3-year-olds into scientists.” 

IOM elects Harry T. Orr as member

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

The Institute of Medicine announced the names of 70 new members and 10 foreign associates during its 44th annual meeting. Among the inductees was Harry T. Orr, director, Institute of Translational Neuroscience, and professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology.

Election to the IOM is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service.

Hormel Institute researchers awarded major grant

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

More than $1.6 million has been awarded to The Hormel Institute's Rhoderick Brown and Edward Hinchcliffe for a collaborative research project on sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of infections that affects many people, including cancer patients.

The two received funding approval for their portion of a nearly $4 million, five-year project with two other research institutions aimed at determining whether a new molecular target could lead to a potential cure for 65 percent of sepsis patients. Sepsis is the 10th-leading cause of death in the United States.

U in the News

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Robert Zink's research is referenced in The Guardian in a story about cats as "pure and simple, ecological pollution"; Stephen Schondelmeyer talks about ways to save on medications in Consumer Reports; Akshay Rao responds to WCCO's "Good Question: Will we ever be wallet free?"; Michael Osterholm comments on why there isn't a vaccine for Ebola at WCCO; Leon Assael comments in The New York Times on the most common chronic childhood disease in the U.S.--tooth decay

U of M ranked 29th best global university by U.S. News & World Report

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

The University of Minnesota Twin Cities was ranked No. 29 in the inaugural "Best Global Universities" rankings released Oct. 28 by U.S. News & World Report, a leading U.S.-based publisher of education analysis and rankings. The U of M ranks No. 9 among U.S. public institutions, and No. 3 among Big Ten Conference public schools, with many American universities dominating the list. Harvard University claims the No. 1 spot overall, followed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology at No. 2 and the University of California—Berkeley at No. 3.

New grant promotes minorities in biomed research

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

The University of Minnesota Program in Health Disparities Research will share an award of $19.2 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to lead professional development activities of underrepresented communities in health science research. The funding will provide intensive grant writing workshops and professional development activities, especially for junior investigators and post-doctoral fellows pursuing biomedical, biobehavioral, clinical and social science research careers.

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